Sorcerer 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Innate Magic

“I recommend you stand back,” the sorcerer growled, their typically impassive, androgynous features twisting into a gleeful snarl. They stood from kneeling, and straightened their heavy, fur-lined robe as frigid air tore at their exposed skin.

A white dragon towered over the half-elf, reared back her head, and guffawed. “Stand back?” she scoffed, casting a cloud of ice crystals toward the domed ceiling of her glacial lair. “You flatter yourself, half-elf.”

The sorcerer matched the dragon’s laughter with a cackle of their own, and strode forward with a purposeful, almost arrogant spring in their step. The sorcerer snapped their fingers, and two crackling flames appeared in their hands, growing larger and larger until the arcane flames engulfed their forearms. “Perhaps I do flatter myself, dragon,” the sorcerer said, tossing their hair back with a flick of their head. “Would you like to flatter me, instead?”

The white dragon growled deep in her throat and took a challenging step forward, mirroring the sorcerer’s movements. “Idiot child. I am Coscyton, the North Wind. I have devoured frost giant jarls for failing to pay me tribute! I have stopped storms with the slightest snarl! The icy air itself obeys my every whim!”

To prove her point, Coscyton reared her head back and breathed a flurry of jagged ice shards into the air, where they hung motionless, as if suspended by wire. She then raised her left claw and the floating icicles began to whirl about as she conjured a howling gale within her lair. Coins and jewels from the hoard of plundered treasure she sat upon were whisked up into the vortex, and the entire chamber was soon filled with sleet and tearing wind. The sorcerer’s companions, who stood easily sixty feet away from their friend, raised their cloaks against the wind. The rogue’s beady eyes focused on a golden chalice caught in the wind, and was knocked onto his back when the cup was hurled straight into his gut.

The sorcerer cocked their head and smiled a crooked smile at the dragon, standing their ground against the wailing wind. Coscyton glowered at her rival, and slammed her talons into the floor. The wind suddenly abated, and a hail of icicles struck the ground, encircling the sorcerer in a jagged ring of ice. Her breath was ragged, and she hoarsely growled at the sorcerer. “That is the power that runs through my draconic blood, elf-spawn. What retort will you spit at me, now?”

The sorcerer’s calm brown eyes met the dragon’s frigid blue gaze. They raised their burning hands, expelled a ring of flames, and melted the cordon of icicles. Then they took another step towards the dragon, never breaking eye contact.

The dragon took an unconscious step backward.

“I ought to be frightened of the power that runs through your draconic blood?” the sorcerer repeated sneeringly. Their brown eyes seemed to shimmer as they strode forward. “No. You should gloat less about the power in your own blood…” The sorcerer’s eyes now shone gold, and they raised their arms to perform a somatic gesture. The dragon took another step back, and now had to crane its serpentine neck upward to continue looking down at the half-elf—and she noticed that her foe’s arms were now sprouting patches of golden scales. “And worry more about the power in mine.”

The sorcerer’s pupils stretched into long slits—a dragon’s eyes. They raised their arms, once more blazing with flame, and drew in a long breath. Then they exhaled. Dragonfire surged from the sorcerer’s mouth, completely engulfing the white dragon in flame. 

You are a sorcerer. Magic courses through your veins, and you alone have the power to control it. You were born with this power, even if you only recently discovered it. Perhaps it first manifested when you were angry, and sparks flew from your fingertips, or when you were scared and you seemed to melt into the shadows. The magic within you is alive, and it could come from anywhere. Some sorcerers trace their magic back to a powerful ancestor, like a dragon, a celestial, or a djinni. Others can delineate their magic to an extraplanar source, such as the shrouded lands of the Shadowfell, or the roiling chaos of Limbo.

Sorcerer is an excellent class for players that want to cast spells and manipulate the rules of magic itself. To unlock the true potential of the sorcerer class, you should already have a solid understanding the general rules of D&D and the rules of spellcasting. Sorcerers take this a step further by using Metamagic to bend the rules of spellcasting and manipulate the laws of magic in their favor. Classes that allow you to cast spells, like sorcerers, wizards, and bards, are generally more complex than their nonmagical counterparts, like barbarians, fighters, and monks. If you want to play a character that expands the laws of magic through sheer force of will, then welcome! The path of the sorcerer holds the power you seek.

The most important thing about playing a character in Dungeons & Dragons is playing them in a way that’s fun for you and your fellow players. However, there are certain basics of how to effectively play a sorcerer that every player should know. D&D is a party-based game in which several characters with a diverse array of abilities contribute to their team’s success in different ways. You should know how to fill your role in the party effectively so that you can help your team advance through the campaign’s story as well as develop your own personal story. This guide will cover the basics of sorcery, walking you through the first 5 levels of playing a sorcerer.

Quick Build Expanded: Building Your Sorcerer

This isn’t a character optimization guide, but the first step in playing your class effectively is building it effectively. The Quick Start guidelines in the Player’s Handbook are a good start, but don’t go far enough for most new players. Here’s an expanded Quick Start guide. This guide assumes you’re using the D&D Beyond Character Builder, which includes helper text for new players.

  • Under “Character Preferences,” turn off “Playtest Content” and “Show Unarmed Strike”
  • Choose your Race. While any race can be a good sorcerer, the most powerful sorcerers tend to be from races that improve your Charisma score. Charisma is your most important ability score because it determines the power of your spells.
    • Tieflings are excellent sorcerers because of their natural +2 bonus to Charisma. Their fiendish heritage grants a few extra spells that they can use once per day, which gives you a few extra chances to use spells to use throughout the day. Playing a tiefling also grants you fire resistance, which is usually useful, but might be redundant if you’re playing a Draconic Bloodline sorcerer.
    • Half-elves gain an innate +2 bonus to Charisma as well, and their Skill Versatility and Fey Ancestry traits are useful bonuses to any type of character. Half-elves are generally a supremely versatile race!
    • Aasimar (from Volo’s Guide to Monsters) also gain a +2 bonus to Charisma, and their celestial heritage make them a supremely thematic option for a Divine Soul sorcerer (from Xanathar’s Guide to Everything). This racial choice grants you incredibly varied damage resistances, the ability to heal with a touch, and in some cases, even the power to fly.
    • Yuan-ti purebloods (from Volo’s Guide to Monsters) have a +2 bonus to Charisma and are resistant to poison, and gain the power to commune with snakes. They are often sinister agents of serpentine cults, and make suitably creepy dark sorcerers.
    • Many other races have a +1 bonus to Charisma, and also make for fantastic sorcerers. It makes sense for Dragonborn to be a draconic bloodline sorcerer, though their overlapping damage resistances can cause some frustration. Tabaxi and Tritons (both from Volo’s) are interesting and unusual choices. And, of course, humans are always a fine choice for any class thanks to their incredible versatility.

What Kind of Sorcerer Are You?

Alongside other spellcasting classes like bard, cleric, and wizard, the sorcerer is one of the most complex and choice-heavy classes in D&D, thanks to the wide variety of spells you’ll have to choose from when constructing your character’s arsenal. You’ll also be choosing a Sorcerous Origin (hereafter referred to as a subclass) that will give you an additional set of tools to fill out your character’s powers.

Together, your choice of subclass and your spell selection will define how you contribute to your party. Do you want to take on the role of Offense, using high-powered spells and blasting your opponents apart? Or do you want to focus on the more balanced role of Defense, using magical wards to keep yourself alive and wearing down your enemies over time? Or would you rather choose the path of Support, and use healing, buffing, and debuffing magic to control the battlefield and empower your allies?

That said, the sorcerers’ limited amount of Spells Known can make it difficult to broaden your horizons and choose spells outside of your specialized role, especially compared to clerics and druids, who can change up their entire spell loadout after a long rest. That said, the sorcerer’s subclass options are all incredibly diverse, with none being focused particularly strongly towards one role. This means that your role is largely dependent on your spell selection.

Since you choose your subclass at 1st level, you don’t have any chance to get a feel for your character and how you want to play them before you choose your subclass. Since your subclass doesn’t have a major impact on your party role and is often a backstory- and character “feel”-based choice, this isn’t too big of an issue. And don’t forget, the spells you’ve chosen don’t have to be permanent. According to the Player’s Handbook, “when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list” [emphasis mine].

(And note, I’m using Offense, Defense, and Support as shorthand. No part of D&D refers to characters in this way, but it’s an easy way to discuss the different roles characters serve in the party.)

Offense

Sorcerers possess incredible offensive power, and their ability to use Metamagic like Heightened Spell and Twinned Spell makes offensive sorcerers a force to be reckoned with. You’ll want to squeeze every last point of damage out of your limited spell slots, making the tactical decision to use your at-will cantrips whenever possible to maximize the damage output of your leveled spells.

Because the sorcerer’s subclasses are all versatile, you can choose just about any subclass and create a potent Offense character, as long as you pick the right spells. The ability to move freely is a boon for offensive characters, so subclasses that grant you the ability to fly, like the Draconic Bloodline and Divine Soul (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything) sorcerous origins, will help you greatly. The Shadow Magic (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything) subclass grants you a limited teleportation ability, which can also come in handy.

Defense

Most sorcerer subclasses grant potent damage resistances and, eventually, movement options that allow you to escape from enemies without giving up all-important damage. The damage resistances (and eventually immunities) granted by the Storm Soul sorcerous origin (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything) are valuable contributions to your defensive arsenal, and the ability to fly short distances when you cast spells can get you out of some sticky situations.

Support

Sorcerers are an arcane spellcasting class, but the Divine Soul sorcerer (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything) grants you access to cleric spells, which allow you to aid your allies and hinder your enemies more effectively than any other sorcerer subclass. Add in class features that improve your ability to heal and an alignment-based bonus spell, and you have supremely effective Support subclass.

Chaos, Chaos!

The Wild Magic subclass from the Player’s Handbook is a subclass so wild and uncontrollable that it doesn’t fit into any role archetype. It’s so volatile and explosive that it could probably be played most effectively in an Offense role, but the randomness inherent to its Wild Magic Surges make it too unpredictable to properly classify. If you had a way of selecting the outcomes of your surges, it could make you a potent Support character… but “Wild Magic” and “predictability” don’t play well together. If you’re playing a Wild Magic sorcerer, throw yourself headlong into combat and always have a backup character ready.

Quick Build Expanded (Part 2)

  • Place your highest ability score in Charisma. The best place to put your second highest ability score depends on what role you want to fill in your party, but you can just as easily place it wherever you want.
    • If you want to fill the role of Offense in your party and focus on dealing damage, place your second highest ability score in Dexterity.
    • If you want to fill the role of Defense in your party and focus on survival, place your second highest ability score in Constitution.
    • If you want to fill the role of Support in your party and focus on using spells to buff your party and debuff your enemies, place your second highest ability score in Constitution.
  • Choose any background that fits your character concept. This is your chance to create a backstory that defies convention. What was your sorcerer before they realized they had innate magical power? Were they a rank-and-file solider in some unknown army, or a guild artisan apprenticed to a master in a far-off city? Or maybe a local sage realized their magical potential at a young age and trained them since birth as an acolyte.
  • Finally, determine your equipment. For an easy selection, click on “EQUIPMENT” when promoted to “Choose EQUIPMENT or GOLD”. Fortunately, it’s hard to go wrong when choosing equipment as a sorcerer, since most of your power comes from your spells, not armor, shields, or swords. Pick whatever equipment suits your vision of your character. If you have gold left over, consider investing 50 gp into a simple diamond. This gives you access to chromatic orb, one of the most powerful damage-dealing spells at low levels.

A Sorcerer in Combat

Magic is everything to a sorcerer. It flows through you like the blood in your veins, and you can even use your own force of will to bend the rules of magic to your whims. While your selection of spells is relatively limited compared to a wizard’s, your versatility in the heat of the moment is more than able to make up for it.

You automatically learn new spells whenever you level up, and you can cast any spell you know at any time, as long as you have an appropriate spell slot. This differentiates you from spellcasting classes like wizards and druids, who have access to a wide array of spells, but must prepare a small selection of them whenever they complete a long rest. You also have a selection of cantrips that you can cast at-will without expending spell slots. Use these like a fighter would use a sword or crossbow, and save those powerful leveled spells to make them really count!

Your spell selection is what makes your sorcerer unique, but it’s also the most challenging and anxiety-inducing part of creating a character. Alternatively, you could use some of these pre-made spell lists to take some of the pressure off. While each of these spell lists is tailored towards Offense, Defense, and Support, any sorcerer can learn these spells after leveling up. If you find that a spell isn’t working for you, you can exchange one spell for another whenever you gain a level in this class. But you can only exchange one spell per level up, so don’t think you can swap out your entire spell list whenever you level up.

Finally, these suggested spell lists are a starting point for sorcerers who don’t know what spells are powerful or useful, or who don’t have a strong grasp on their character’s personal style. You can (and should) tailor these lists of spells to not just your personal preference, but also to the sort of challenges you are facing in your own campaign.

All Sorcerers

At 1st level, you choose your subclass and gain the ability to cast spells. Fantastic! Your subclass doesn’t have a major effect on what combat role you want to fill in your party. Even though your subclass choices are all filled to the brim with major combat and non-combat features, they’re all reasonably balanced between Offense and Defense, with a little bit of Support utility thrown in. The Draconic Bloodline from the Player’s Handbook gives you dragon-like damage resistances, eventually culminating in growing dragon wings and gaining a dragon’s Frightful Presence. Also from the Player’s Handbook, Wild Magic gives you a giant table of random effects that might go off when you cast a spell.

The following subclasses, from Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, more than double the number of sorcerer subclasses in the game. The Divine Soul origin ties your fate to a celestial from a higher plane, granting you the ability to use cleric spells, manifest angel wings, and even save yourself from death. It’s easily your best Support subclass option. Following the path of Shadow Magic means your character is somehow linked to the Shadowfell or another realm or being of darkness. It grants you stealthy abilities, the ability to manifest a shadowy beast that fights at your side, and the ability to turn incorporeal. I did a full rundown of this subclass around Halloween season this year. Finally, the power of Storm Sorcery links you to an elemental being like a djinn, or the elemental plane of Air or Water, granting you the power to control the weather around you.

The spells and cantrips you learn at this level are detailed further in the Offense, Defense, and Support sections.

At 2nd level, your Font of Magic feature grants you sorcery points. You won’t be able to do much with them yet, but you can transform sorcery points into spell slots! Right now, you have 2 sorcery points, and it costs 2 points to create a 1st-level spell slot. So essentially, you can use an extra 1st-level spell once per day. Not much, but it’s a little extra push for you!

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to use Metamagic. You can choose two forms at this level, and your best choices are explained in the Offense, Defense, and Support sections.

At 4th level, you gain an Ability Score Improvement or a feat! Most sorcerers want to maximize their Charisma score as quickly as possible to increase their spells’ potency, but you may wish to choose a feat to accentuate your role in the party.

At 5th level, you gain access to 3rd-level spells. This marks a huge increase in potential power, and the spells you’ll want to choose are role-specific.

Offense

Sorcerers have a wealth of offensive spells to draw upon, and judicious use of Metamagic can multiply your damage output and rain terror upon your enemies. Unless you have the hit point boost and improved Armor Class of a Draconic Bloodline sorcerer, you should try to keep out of harm’s way as much as possible.

At 1st level, you learn four cantrips from the sorcerer spell list. You don’t get to change these, so choose wisely. You should choose at least two offensive cantrips so that you always have an at-will attack to fall back on. Good close-range damage cantrips include sword burst or thunderclap. Long-range damage cantrips include fire bolt, frostbite, and ray of frost. You should pick at least one utility cantrip like friends, mending, or prestidigitation to round out your skill set.

Also at 1st level, you learn two 1st-level spells from the sorcerer spell list. Both should be damage-dealing spells. If you have 50 gp to spare at character creation, invest in the one-time cost of a diamond worth 50 gp, the material component of chromatic orb, one of the most powerful and versatile damage-dealing spells at low levels. Otherwise, good damage-dealing spells include burning hands, chaos bolt, ice knife, magic missile, and thunderwave.

At 2nd level, you gain Font of Magic (see “All Sorcerers,” above). You also learn a new 1st-level spell. Choose another offensive spell. Did you know that you can filter spells by tag in the D&D Beyond spell database? Choosing “Damage” will give you a list of all spells that deal damage!

At 3rd level, you gain Metamagic. This potent feature lets you warp the rules of magic to suit your needs. Choose Twinned Spell and one other Metamagic option of your choice. Twinned Spell only affects single-target spells (like chromatic orb or ray of sickness), but it effectively doubles your spell slot usage by allowing you to instantaneously fire off a duplicate of that spell.

Also at 3rd level, you learn a new spell and gain the ability to cast 2nd-level spells. You should learn an offensive 2nd-level spell, such as mind spike, scorching ray, or shadow blade. If you want, you can also trade out one spell you know for another, if you want an additional 2nd-level spell, or you want to trade out one underused combat spell for one with more utility.

At 4th level, you gain an ability score increase, or a feat! If you want to improve your chances of dealing greater damage, you should put both points into Charisma. If you want a feat to help improve your damage output, consider the Lucky, Spell Sniper, or War Caster feats.

You also learn a fifth cantrip at this level. Consider rounding out your toolset with a more utility-focused cantrip. Finally, you learn a new spell. Based on how you’ve been playing, you can decide if you need more damage-dealing spells or if you need something to keep you alive, like shield or mage armor.

At 5th level, you gain the ability to cast 3rd-level spells! You also learn one additional spell, which should obviously be a 3rd-level one. Fireball is a straightforward and powerful choice, but half-utility, half-damage spells like thunder step or sleet storm could be useful if you have enough raw damage already.

Defense

Sorcerers who focus on defense don’t do so by bulking up in heavy armor, but rather manipulate terrain and improve their own mobility to stay out of reach of enemies while peppering them with lighter attacks.

At 1st level, you learn four cantrips from the sorcerer spell list. You don’t get to change these, so choose wisely. The only damage-mitigating cantrip is blade ward, which could come in handy. You should choose at least one offensive cantrip so that you always have an at-will attack to fall back on, such as frostbite, which imposes disadvantage on the target’s next attack, or shocking grasp, which can help you escape tough situations by preventing the target from making an opportunity attack. You should pick at least one utility cantrip like friends, mending, or prestidigitation to round out your skill set.

Also at 1st level, you learn two 1st-level spells from the sorcerer spell list. Choose mage armor and one damage-dealing spell. If you have 50 gp to spare at character creation, invest in the one-time cost of a diamond worth 50 gp, the material component of chromatic orb, one of the most powerful and versatile damage-dealing spells at low levels. Otherwise, good damage-dealing spells include burning hands, ice knife, magic missile, and thunderwave.

At 2nd level, you gain Font of Magic (see “All Sorcerers,” above). You also learn a new 1st-level spell. Choose a control spell, such as color spray, fog cloud, or sleep. Did you know that you can filter spells by tag in the D&D Beyond spell database? Choosing “Control” will give you a list of all spells that can manipulate the battlefield and your opponents!

At 3rd level, you gain Metamagic. This potent feature lets you warp the rules of magic to suit your needs. You can only choose two, but you have plenty of options. If you’re operating on stealth missions, Subtle Spell will help you stay quiet while casting. If you’re casting buff or debuff spells, Extended Spell can give you more bang for your buck. Quickened Spell will let you cast most spells as a bonus action, giving you an action free to cast a cantrip or perform another action. Careful Spell can be useful if you’re casting lots of spells with an area of effect, as it allows you to shield your allies from the spell’s effects.  

Also at 3rd level, you learn a new spell and gain the ability to cast 2nd-level spells. You should learn a defensive 2nd-level spell, such as blur or invisibility. Now that you have more hit points, you can probably trade out mage armor for shield. Enemy attack bonuses are probably getting high enough that the slight AC boost from mage armor will start to lessen in effectiveness soon.

At 4th level, you gain an ability score increase, or a feat! If you want to improve your chances of your spells overpowering your enemies, you should put both points into Charisma. If you want a feat to help improve your defensive capabilities, consider the Lucky, Spell Sniper, or War Caster feats. (Yes, these are the same feats suggested for Offense!)

You also learn a fifth cantrip at this level. Consider rounding out your toolset with a more utility-focused cantrip. Lightning lure is an interesting mix between damage output and battlefield manipulation, which is right in your wheelhouse. Finally, you learn a new spell. This spell should be a 2nd-level spell that hinders your enemies, like blindness/deafness, crown of madness, hold person,

At 5th level, you gain the ability to cast 3rd-level spells! You also learn one additional spell, which should obviously be a 3rd-level one. Blink allows you to phase between reality and the Ethereal Plane. Most importantly, it doesn’t require concentration, allowing you to cast a powerful concentration spell and then wink out of existence for a bit so that no one can interfere. Counterspell is a game-changer when fighting powerful enemy spellcasters. If you can counterspell their fight-ending powerhouse spell, then you can seriously swing the fight in your party’s favor.

Support

All sorcerers have the ability to cast spells that buff their allies and debuff their enemies, but Divine Soul sorcerers do it better than anyone, thanks to their ability to choose both sorcerer and cleric spells. This guide assumes you chose Divine Soul, and offers spells from both spell lists. Non-Divine Soul options are also valid, but they sacrifice a lot of versatility.

At 1st level, you learn four cantrips from the sorcerer or cleric spell lists. You don’t get to change these, so choose wisely. The guidance cantrip allows you to improve your allies’ ability checks, and resistance likewise allows you to improve their saving throws. You should choose at least one offensive cantrip so that you always have an at-will attack to fall back on, such as frostbite, which imposes disadvantage on the target’s next attack, or shocking grasp, which can help you escape tough situations by preventing the target from making an opportunity attack. You should pick at least one utility cantrip like friends, mending, or prestidigitation to round out your skill set.

Also at 1st level, you learn two 1st-level spells from the sorcerer or cleric spell lists. Choose either bless or bane, depending on whether you would rather buff allies or debuff enemies. Also, pick one defensive spell; mage armor is a useful choice thanks to its impressive 8 hour duration. Even though you didn’t choose any offensive spells, your damage-dealing cantrips should be enough to see you through safely.

At 2nd level, you gain Font of Magic (see “All Sorcerers,” above). You also learn a new 1st-level spell. Choose a healing spell, such as cure wounds or healing word. The former heals more, but only at touch range, whereas the latter heals less, but can do so from a distance. Did you know that you can filter spells by tag in the D&D Beyond spell database? Choosing “Healing” will give you a list of all spells that can restore hit points!

At 3rd level, you gain Metamagic. This potent feature lets you warp the rules of magic to suit your needs. You can only choose two, but your choices are clear. Twinned Spell allows you to double the effectiveness of your single-target damage and healing spells, allowing you to make greater use of your limited spell slots. Alternatively, Empowered Spell is a cheaper option that lets you reroll your dice to gamble for a better result, and can be combined with other Metamagics. Your other option is a toss-up between Heightened Spell, which is an expensive choice that imposes disadvantage on the first saving throw against a spell you cast, or Extended Spell, which doubles the duration of your buff or debuff spells.

All of these options are useful, and your choice should come down to the challenges you’re facing in your campaign.

Also at 3rd level, you learn a new spell and gain the ability to cast 2nd-level spells from the sorcerer or cleric spell lists. You should learn lesser restoration to help your party survive pesky status conditions. Now that you have more hit points, you can probably trade out mage armor for shield. Enemy attack bonuses are probably getting high enough that the slight AC boost from mage armor will start to lessen in effectiveness soon.

At 4th level, you gain an ability score increase, or a feat! If you want to improve your chances of your spells overpowering your enemies, you should put both points into Charisma. If you want a feat to help improve your defensive capabilities, consider the Lucky or War Caster feats.

You also learn a fifth cantrip at this level. At this point, you might want a specialized offensive cantrip like word of radiance or thunderclap, which allows you to deal damage in a close area of effect around you. This can help if you find yourself accidentally surrounded by enemies. Finally, you learn a new spell. This spell should be a 2nd-level spell that either hinders your enemies, like hold person, or that has an out-of-combat effect like zone of truth.

At 5th level, you gain the ability to cast 3rd-level spells from the sorcerer or cleric spell lists! You also learn one additional spell, which should obviously be a 3rd-level one. Particularly sinister Support sorcerers could choose animate dead, which would give your party a literal meat shield for the party—and ultimately lets you command up to four zombies or skeletons as you gather more undead servants. Bestow curse is a mighty debuff spell, and remove curse is a similarly powerful buff. In the same vein, slow can ruin even the mightiest of monsters, and haste can turn an ally into a lightning-fast warrior.

A Sorcerer of Your Own

Sorcerers are one of the most thematic classes in D&D, and the wealth of options presented to them is a blessing, even if it may at times seem like a curse. No matter what this guide says, the only right way to play a sorcerer is the way you want to play one. As long as you’re having fun and helping your friends have fun, you’re doing it right.


James Haeck is the lead writer for D&D Beyond, the co-author of  Waterdeep: Dragon Heist and the Critical Role Tal'Dorei Campaign Setting, the DM of  Worlds Apartand a freelance writer for Wizards of the Coast, the D&D Adventurers League, and Kobold Press. He lives in Seattle, Washington with his partner Hannah and their kitty familiars Mei and Marzipan. You can usually find him wasting time on Twitter at @jamesjhaeck.

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